Parent’s Guide to Amblyopia in Kids

Parent’s Guide to Amblyopia in Kids

Amblyopia is the technical term for a condition that most parents know as “lazy eye.” This condition is one of the most common eye problems, with amblyopia in kids affecting nearly one out of every hundred children. As a parent, you might not understand what lazy eye is, how it affects kids, why it happens, or what you can do about it. Here are some of the things that you might need to know!

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Should Kids Wear Eye Protection When Playing Sports?

Should Kids Wear Eye Protection When Playing Sports

Many sports entail some risks for participants. These days, you might be more worried about the eye strain caused by blue light exposure due to the many hours that kids spend engaged with technologies like TV, video games, computers, and mobile devices. The risk for eye injury in sports also bears consideration, though. The easy solution is to make sure your children have proper eye protection for the sports they love. In some cases, they may need different options for different activities, but the benefits make having the right eye protection on hand well worthwhile.

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Helping Your Child Develop Healthy Vision

Develop Healthy Vision in Children

Approximately 547,083 American children struggle with visual complications. As a parent, you can try a variety of techniques to help your child enjoy healthy vision. By ensuring your child consumes a healthy diet, carries out visual exercises, and goes for regular pediatric eye checkups, you can help them preserve and strengthen their eyesight.

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How to Prevent Eye Strain Through Office Ergonomics

Prevent Eye Strain Through Office Ergonomics

Office ergonomics are commonly associated with back/neck, and hand/wrist health. Yet, proper desk ergonomics is also beneficial to the health and comfort of your eyes. Nearly 80% of U.S. jobs are considered desk-bound or sedentary. Now, with the pandemic even more people have been required to work from home. Because of this shift, there is less walking and more sitting. While office ergonomics might have been considered by your employer, not many apply it to their home office.

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Do Kids Need Blue Light Glasses?

Digital Learning and Blue Light Glasses.jpg

Summer is quickly coming to an end and that means the school year is upon us. And, as we know, many of the kids will be learning remotely. Which also means that extra screen time is inevitable. Now, there is a lot of buzz surrounding the benefits of blue light glasses for adults that stare at screens all day, but are they a good idea for the kiddos? Here’s everything you need to know about blue light and protective glasses.

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Do Your Eyes Grow with Age?

eyes grow baby eyes

Although it’s not the most common topic to discuss when it comes to aging and physical health, it’s important to understand how our eyes grow and develop. Did you know that at birth our eyes are about two-thirds smaller than they’ll be when we reach adulthood? It’s true. And, understanding your eyes will help you take better care of them in the future. Read on to learn how the eyes grow and develop from birth to late adult life. 

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25 Alternatives to Screen Time for Kids This Summer

Alternatives to Screen Time feature

Summertime screams unlimited free time, relaxation, and no homework. But, during those few months away from the classroom, children are likely to spend more time in front of screens. Of course, too much screen time is bad for anyone, young or old. Not to mention, one of the biggest health issues related to smart devices are vision-related. Learn more about the impact of prolonged screen usage, as well as alternatives to screen time for kids this summer.

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Childhood Vision Problems and Their Warning Signs

childhood vision problems

As a parent, you want the best for your children in every aspect of their lives. That includes their vision. You may already be aware of the importance of regular eye doctor visits. However, there are warning signs of potential issues to be aware of. That way, you can spot symptoms early and inform your doctor. Here’s what you need to know to identify and address the most common childhood vision problems.

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Eye Test for Kids 101

eye test for kids 101

The first eye test for kids should take place by a pediatrician when the child is six months old. It’s wise to get them checked early to rule out disease and lazy eye. Even if there are no risk factors or family history of eye problems, children should have their vision checked again at age 3 and before first grade. By age 2 ½ to 3 ½, all children should have a routine professional, comprehensive eye health, vision and vision development examination. Further, screenings by pediatricians or schools are not a substitute for a professional eye exam.

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